“Never assess the situation from your own lens…” – A Carmen Q&A

Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world – and we like to check in with people. In this installment of our series of conversations, Carmen spoke to Colin Hatfield the founder and senior partner at Visible Leaders.

Carmen: Hello Colin; tell me a bit more about your work…

Colin: We help leaders to articulate a vision that inspires – at all levels. We help them develop the skills to engage their internal and external audiences, to drive performance and realise their organization’s ambitions.

We believe that at the heart of leadership lies great communication. Great leaders inspire change and motivate their teams through what they say, what they do and how they listen.

Carmen: You’ve played this game more than once…

Colin: Yes! And it has developed quite a bit. The first time I tried it was when it was in a very early version. And then I partook in a ‘proper’ session earlier this year at the Strategic Adviser Forum as part of IABC’s World Conference in Montreal.

I think it works on many many levels. It is an idea that we could build in with some of our clients, and some of the relationships we’ve got.

Carmen: What surprised you the most?

Colin: Perhaps not surprised, but what I liked the most is the discussion it generates. In some situations there is a right and wrong answer. but in many there aren’t. What is interesting is to see a bunch of professionals in the room come to different outcomes. Understanding the different factors that informed their decision-making process. Getting into that was enlightening.

Carmen: You’ve recently been writing and speaking about Adaptive Leadership. Is this something that is relevant here?

Colin: Adaptive leadership is about how leaders show up: reading a situation, understanding the context – and understanding how to have the best possible impact. It is a move on from the pure ‘authenticity’ discussion that has been going on for some time. I think the game could easily be used to explore some of these challenges and approaches in practice.

Carmen: Have you got a couple of top tips from Adaptive Leadership that could be used by others playing the game?

Colin: Sure!

  1. Never assess the situation from your own lens. What’s great about the Adaptive Leadership approach is that it helps you look at things from the point of view of your stakeholders.
  2. Experiment – try taking on the different ‘personas’ as you think through the challenge. That’s essential when you play this game – and in work in general. Explore what makes the various stakeholders you deal with tick.

Carmen: Big thanks Colin – and where can we find out more about your work?

Read our blog for more on Adaptive Leadership – and you may also find our recent white papers on Communication Across Cultures and A Practical Approach to Stakeholder Management useful.

Connect with Colin on LinkedIn if you want to learn more – and follow @VisibleLeaders

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.

“…you’ll also make connections – who knows, maybe even a future colleague or mentor.” – A Carmen Q&A

Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world – and we like to check in with people. In this installment of our series of conversations, Carmen spoke to Adity Tripathi who played the game at the London College of Communication as part of the MA in Public Relations.

Carmen: Tell me a bit more about yourself

I’ve been living in London for about a year. I came here from New Delhi in order to do a Master’s degree in Public Relations.

Right now I’m working on my dissertation. It is on the topic of Male Gaze, something the feminist film critic Laura Mulvey identified her 1975 essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema“. I’m exploring how it still applies today – well beyond cinema. If you have something interesting to add on that, do reach out.

Carmen: Interesting work Adity. Now, you played Corporate Snakes & Career Ladders – how did you find it?

Adity: It was a unique experience – and a lot of fun. We were 5-6 people and it was like game grew up with us, and us with it. We learnt a lot as a group.

Carmen: What was the main take-away for you?

Adity: We had to make lots of decisions. Your decisions individually, and as a team, directly impact the result. It isn’t always about following the text-book approach so to speak. You really have to collaborate with the others on the team.

Carmen: Would you play it again?

Adity: Definitively. In addition to have fun and learning, you’ll also make connections – who knows, maybe even a future colleague or mentor!

Carmen: What’s next for you?

Graduation – and then I’ll be searching for a job. If you have ideas / opportunities, do contact me.

Connect with Adity on LinkedIn – and follow her @adity_noni

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you. We feature on the curriculum for Adity’s course.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.

 

“A bit like taking part in … Moral Maze” – A Carmen Q&A

Steven Shepperson-Smith, shares his experience playing Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders.

Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world – and we like to check in with people. In this instalment of our series of conversations, Carmen spoke to Steven Shepperson-Smith, a Chartered PR Practitioner and Chair of the Chartered Institute for Public Relations (CIPR) Greater London Group. 

Carmen: I noticed that you’re a chartered practitioner, can you tell me a little bit more about that?

Steven: I’ve been working in communications for about 20 years now. I’ve been in the CIPR for my whole career.

CIPR is the only chartered body for the PR industry in the UK, meaning it is responsible for maintaining high professional standards in the industry. It supports practitioners on two fronts: developing their skills and careers; and ensuring that they have a very clear ethical code to follow, enabling CIPR members to demonstrate strong judgment when making decisions.

Chartered status is the gold standard for practitioners in the UK. It is a peer based assessment of a person’s leadership qualities, strategic approach and ethical standards. I qualified a couple years ago and it’s a great club to be in. It tells employers and customers that you’ll do a job in a highly effective and professional manner.

Chartered Status also underpins the importance of continuous professional development (CPD). It’s really important that PR practitioners invest in their careers and keep learning, Committing to CPD is just a way of making sure you do that alongside all the other work priorities!

Carmen: How did you come across Corporate Snakes & Career Ladders?

Steven: I am chair of the CIPR Greater London Group. The last couple of years CIPR has run an ethics month (#EthicsFest) and we’ve used the game in that context. I’ve played it twice myself.

It’s quite a fun way for people to engage in ethics for their CPD points. There’s a compulsory requirement: you’ve got to do one ethics module – and quite a lot of the time it can feel a bit theoretical and dull.

Instead, playing a game and discussing scenarios and trying to win against other practitioners is great fun.

I talked before about using strong judgment, what was really helpful was sitting in a room just talking with other senior practitioners about ethical quandaries. There is no guarantee at all that any of the scenarios will occur for real in a person’s career but it helps to hear different approaches to a problem. With ethics, as you know, there’s not always a right or wrong – but a lot of grey in between. It was a bit like taking part in BBC Radio 4’s Moral Maze from that perspective!

Carmen: Great. What’s next?

StevenCIPR Greater London Group holds a free Drink event on the second Monday of every month at the Merchant House in Fleet Street. It’s the biggest PR networking drinks in London and we’d love to see you there sometime. You can book for that and other events on our Eventbrite page.

If you would like to learn more about attaining and maintain Chartered Practitioner status, connect with Steven on LinkedIn. 

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.

“How can I become more strategic?” – A Carmen Q&A

IMG-20180727-WA0018Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world – and we like to check in with people. In this installment of our series of conversations, Carmen spoke to Cari Simmons, Senior Communications Consultant, Worldwide Sales Enablement at Citrix. 

Carmen: Tell me more about your your work?

Cari: I’ve been working with Citrix for five years in October and I’ve always had a communications role. I originally did communications for our Americas sales audience (about 1,000 people in North and South America). In January I moved over into a worldwide position.

We have sellers from Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and North and South America.

So it’s an interesting transition. It’s definitely been a nice learning experience.

Carmen: That’s great. And when when you you’re not working at Citrix (and not playing Corporate Snakes & Career Ladders)?

Cari: I’m a big Netflix fan. I like to catch up on the latest shows with my husband. My dog is also a key priority in my life. I like taking her on walks.

Carmen: Nice. Now, you participated in our game at #IABC18. Have you been to a World Conference before?

Cari:  This was the first time that I had been! It was awesome.

I would say I went into it pretty blind but it was a great learning experience. I didn’t anticipate that many people from around the world coming to this event. But it was amazing to learn from other people’s experiences about what worked and didn’t work for them in terms of communications.

Carmen: And you also participated in Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders. Tell me more about that?

Cari: My manager encouraged me to sign up and go to that conference – and also recommended that I start it off with Snakes and Ladders. I didn’t really think we’d play a game; I thought that was just a description.

But I was very pleasantly surprised when I got there that it wasn’t the typical conference session where you’re sitting down and listening to a panel or somebody speak, and share their perspective for 50 minutes.

It was truly interactive and very eye opening. Not to sugarcoat anything here; but our team was not to the top team… I think that was interesting to see, because it altered my perspective of how I was normally thinking.

Carmen: Interesting, how so?

I needed to shift my perspective a little bit and the Snakes and Ladders really helped me to do that. It helped me start thinking ‘how can I become more strategic?’.

Carmen: That’s great. And then what surprised you the most about the experience?

Really how relatable a lot of the situations were and how different the opinions from people were. I think we had about five people in our group. Some were adamant on one answer and some very set on alternatives. It was interesting to hear the rationale each put behind their approach. We talked about this in the larger group too, agreeing that in real life, sometimes a blend of two answers might work best. And sometimes, also in real life, you might need to blend three answers. So it’s just good to chat and learn about everything.

Carmen: Has your approach at work changed?

Cari: Yeah, I don’t remember all of the classifications but we talked about how you look at different tasks. I think there was a nurse and a physician and stuff like that. So I’ve really taken that to heart and look at how the different tasks that I work on.

That’s helped me execute some tasks on my end better – and it helps gets my message across better to my key stakeholders.

Carmen: What other resources do you draw on to learn?

Cari: I’m always working on expanding my communications knowledge. I love getting different perspectives, and that includes following Carmen Spinoza on Twitter.

Something that we work with a lot here at Citrix is having that growth mindset, which I felt a lot playing a game. You don’t need to be afraid to fail. Sometimes failure helps you – and failure is the way to learn and move into the next step.

I’m going to pitch the game to my manager soon. Our team interest just grew by about 3 folks and I think it would be good for us in a corporate setting with a lot of different stakeholders and people who have their skin in the game. It’ll help us be seen as strategic leaders and partners.

If you would like to learn more about getting a growth mindset, as Cari has, why not connect with her on LinkedIn and follow her @Cari_Swerty 

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.

 

“The time-sensitive element of the game made it feel like real life” – A Carmen Q&A

Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world – and we like to check in with people. In this instalment of our series of conversations, Carmen spoke to Kimberley Rose, Director of Strategic Communications at University of Florida Health in the United States.

“No talking at each other, but really collaborating and engaging. Under pressure I might add. The time-sensitive element of the game made it feel like real life.”

C: Hi Kim! Let’s start with telling our readers a little bit more about you and the organization you work for.

K: Hi Carmen! Well, I’m the director for strategic communication at University of Florida Health. It’s an organization that brings together higher education with first-class hospitals. In Florida we have two main campuses, six health colleges, nine research institutes and centres, nine hospitals and a host of physician medical practices and outpatient services, as well as affiliates statewide. So it’s a very, very big academic health system!

I’ve been with them for over 20 years. I was first hired by the corporate health care system and now we’re integrated with the university health system, so I joke that I work in a “corporademia” setting. This combined setting plus the fast pace of a hospital network makes my job very exciting. I love what I do. I’ve been lucky to evolve and reinvent myself over the years.

C: So what do you do now?

K: Today I lead a team that does strategic comms – internal and business communication, issues management, crisis and emergency response. In addition to supporting the hospitals through crisis – from responding to major mass casualty accidents to hurricanes -my team also has a lot of clients in the system, we develop and roll out together strategic comms plans and provide strategic comms counsel to execs and leaders.

C: Much like you, I also provide strategic communications counsel to senior executive team. In that line, how would you describe a successful strategic adviser?

K: I love talking about being an “intrapreneur”. I want my staff to always be entrepreneurial within our structure. We deliver what our clients need and we are always looking for ways to stay positive and creative and tackle challenges and have fun along the way. That was partly why your game, Carmen, resonated so well with me.

C: Tell me a bit more about your your experience of playing Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders?

K: I took part at the launch of the game in New Orleans in 2016. I was struck at how polished and professional it was. I remembered being a little daunted because I only knew two people at my table . But it turned out great. The game forced us to get to know each other and collaborate really quickly. It was remarkable how when you play, you get to hear other people’s perspectives and ideas for handling situations with a different approach than you would have taken. It was an incredible learning experience.

I also realised that, although part of a communication conference, the game was really about business. It was all about understanding what the ultimate goals and the needs of the audiences were. It got us to ask questions in a different way that in other sessions. No talking at each other, but really collaborating and engaging. Under pressure I might add. The time-sensitive element of the game made it feel like real life.

C: Did anything feel differently after playing the game?

K: It set the tone for my IABC World Conference experience. Because it was a about ideas and how you apply them, it helped me become a better listener and helped me build consensus.

During the game, I established relationships with people I didn’t know. At our table we had a very international group representing all different industries and backgrounds. The nature of the game helped us get to know each other and appreciate our professional expertise and how we’d actually apply our expertise. When playing, you need to show your strategic decision-making skills and knowledge. For example, when explaining why would they chose an option, they would illustrate with examples from their world. So it gave me insight to the kind of work they do in other industries.

Corporate Snakes and Ladders makes you put your elevator pitch into action.

C: What advice would you give any advice to future players?

K: You really need to participate and be unafraid to speak up and ask questions. You are going to learn quickly just how many ways there are to approach comms challenges, and that your usual way may not be the best. So, I’d say: “go with a really open mind and be prepared to be wrong, connect, shared ideas and go with a sense of fun!”.

C: Anything else you liked about the game?

K: I loved that at the end, we all bonded because we were intellectually connected and exhausted! It was like having run a marathon together. The competition angle worked really well. I don’t think there was even a prize, but we really wanted to win.

C: Thanks for your time Kim!

If you would like to learn more about working in health communication or reinventing your career in the same company, as Kim has done, you can reach her via LinkedIn.

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.

“It was fun (which I didn’t expect)!” – A Carmen Q&A

Hundreds have played Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders around the world. In this series Carmen interviews some of them. Today’s conversation was with Alexandra Rodríguez Cifre. 

C: Hello Alex! Tell me a bit more about yourself…

A: I am originally from the Canary Islands. I studied journalism in Barcelona and after a few years of working, I decided I wanted a new challenge. So came to London and saved up for a Master’s. After much research, I decided that the one from London College of Communications was the best one for me.

C: What’s your focus at the moment?

A: Exploring the relationship between journalists and public relations practitioners. Specifically in the field of travel and entertainment I’m trying to get as many voices into my research as I can. Also, I really like dealing with the media, a part of me misses that connection with journalists.

C: Interesting! I’m sure some of our readers will want to help (see the end for that).

C: Meanwhile, can you tell me more about your experience of playing Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders?

A: First we had a session on careers with Casilda and Stephen, which covered how to apply for jobs, how to do an interviews etc. It was really interesting.

Our second session was the game. We didn’t know what to expect so when we got there we were really impressed with the materials. It made us feel like we were doing something important, that we weren’t just playing a game.

Some of the questions we didn’t know how to approach, so we tried using common sense.

I learnt a lot through the game. It was tough, but as Stephen reminded us: ‘In every job opportunity we always have something to learn and to progress’ and ‘don’t lose your passion’.

I learnt how to put myself in situations that I had never been in before. And it made me think of things I had never thought of before.

For example, when dealing with big budgets (which I haven’t yet), you need to think things through, check with people from different departments and so on. It has helped me have a more mature approach to future jobs.

The game showed me some gaps in my understanding, but also how I can fill those: work as a team. And it prepared my mindset for future challenges.

It was fun (which I didn’t expect)!

It gave us time to discuss in the different teams. Learning from other people, and different approaches was really useful. I wish we would have done it again.

Alex tried Corporate Snakes and Career Ladders as part of her Master’s programme at the London College of Communication. You can connect with her on LinkedIn, follow her on Twitter – and if you’re interested in helping contribute to her research, do reach out to her.

And if you’d like to try the game: see if it is right for you.

If you’re an alumni and you’d like to be interviewed by Carmen, let us know here.